Can anyone tell me ............

Maggie Jones

Well-Known Member
#1
Can anyone tell me please which episode showed Cleggy visiting his late wife's grave with flowers? As he seldom shows any real affection for her, or marriage, this episode was a rarity showing him in a different light.
 

maltrab

Administrator
Staff member
#2
Can anyone tell me please which episode showed Cleggy visiting his late wife's grave with flowers? As he seldom shows any real affection for her, or marriage, this episode was a rarity showing him in a different light.
It was the pilot episode Maggie
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#3
Yes twas Of Funerals and Fish and Clegg rides his bike along
side a funeral march, leaves flowers at his wife's grave,
and pops a flower in his vest.

"I don't know, lass; it's a rum old world. Nonetheless, I, uh,
I think I'll go and get a bit of sausage for me tea."
 

barmpot

Well-Known Member
#4
Yes twas Of Funerals and Fish and Clegg rides his bike along
side a funeral march, leaves flowers at his wife's grave,
and pops a flower in his vest.

"I don't know, lass; it's a rum old world. Nonetheless, I, uh,
I think I'll go and get a bit of sausage for me tea."

please note the word vest here is American usage: we would never see Cleggy in his vest ....
 

barmpot

Well-Known Member
#6
He has the last words in the first episode and the last words in the final episode !:thumbsup:

He is the one continuous thread throughout the whole show - with Ivy a close second. My favourite character as I see a lot of myself in him!
 

dick

Well-Known Member
#8
It might have been his jacket Chuck., years ago a buttonhole was incorporated into the lapel of suit jackets for the sole purpose of wearing a flower. You probably know , that a vest over here is worn under the shirt as an extra layer .This is from the days when winters were more fierce over here than they are now .:)
 

Brian Johns

Well-Known Member
#9
Over here, what is called a "vest" in the UK is referred to as a "singlet".
A vest here generally means a sort of jacket, (eg Life Vest...also known as a life jacket , Bullet proof Vest etc etc.) usually without sleeves. It isn't used much; neither are bullet proof vests!!:thumbsup:

Another couple of terms I just thought of....Ear Protectors are known here as earmuffs, Trousers are known as pants (colloquially also known as "Daks") and what are called "pants" in Uk are known as UNDERpants, ("UNDERdaks") here, also known as Undies and in a version of rhyming slang "Reg Grundies" after a famous television producer here.
Sweaters are generally "jumpers" but that is slowly changing.
Sweatsuits are tracksuits, Sweat pants are track pants...also known as "TrakkyDaks".

If there is a conceivable (or even Inconceivable) way of shortening terms and words the ozzies are masters at it! (see what I mean??:32::32:)
 

dick

Well-Known Member
#11
Over here, what is called a "vest" in the UK is referred to as a "singlet".
A vest here generally means a sort of jacket, (eg Life Vest...also known as a life jacket , Bullet proof Vest etc etc.) usually without sleeves. It isn't used much; neither are bullet proof vests!!:thumbsup:

Another couple of terms I just thought of....Ear Protectors are known here as earmuffs, Trousers are known as pants (colloquially also known as "Daks") and what are called "pants" in Uk are known as UNDERpants, ("UNDERdaks") here, also known as Undies and in a version of rhyming slang "Reg Grundies" after a famous television producer here.
Sweaters are generally "jumpers" but that is slowly changing.
Sweatsuits are tracksuits, Sweat pants are track pants...also known as "TrakkyDaks".

If there is a conceivable (or even Inconceivable) way of shortening terms and words the ozzies are masters at it! (see what I mean??:32::32:)
Now got 3 countries divided by a common language! ;)
 

Maggie Jones

Well-Known Member
#12
Hello all. Thanks for your replies about the episode with Clegg. While you're on the subject of different words used for the same item, can I ask any/all of you from up North if a barmcake is the same as what we would call here a bap?

I worked with someone from the North who told me this when I asked her what a barmcake was, as she frequently talked about having a barmcake at lunch time. I thought it was something sweet to eat but she then told me it was what we called a bap!
 

cciaffone

Well-Known Member
#13
Google "barm cake" and you shall see.

"In parts of North West England and Yorkshire, a barm or barm cake is a common term for a soft, floury bread roll."