Names or surnames

codfanglers

Dedicated Member
I would imagine Roy Clarke thought up names that would be in keeping with the area he is writing about.He also uses catchy,easily remembered names,possibly ones that he thinks will fit a particular character.He also uses names that sort of run of the tongue very naturally and easily,a bit like rhythm in musical notes.It would be hard to imagine Foggy as Foggy Jones,Foggy Smith but Foggy Dewhurst is spot on.Imagine Auntie as Auntie Walker,Wilson and so on,they just dont hit the mark as well as Auntie Wainwright.

Hector.
Great. I am learning something new again. I agree totally with Hector and rephrasing my comments before, there is a certain poetic sound to the fully names. I love just hearing the guys talk at the beginning of the show about people from their past with all their interesting sounding names.
 

dick

LOTSW Fanatic
I could be way off the mark here with my theory on surnames, but i believe that surnames where derived from the sort of work a men did. For example a blacksmith would get Smith and his son Smithson etc. This could have started way back to the Viking invasion, with the art of adding 'son' to the end of the farther's forename (Anderson and many more) thus getting Johnson, Thompson and many more.
The names also often came from where they lived as well, part of my name means clearing or meadow. The biggest laugh of all from Roys choice of names is CLEGG.According to what I can find out a Clegg is a name in Scotland for a horsefly with a nasty bite. How far from dear old Normans temperament is that????? :eek: :D
 

codfanglers

Dedicated Member
I would imagine Roy Clarke thought up names that would be in keeping with the area he is writing about.He also uses catchy,easily remembered names,possibly ones that he thinks will fit a particular character.He also uses names that sort of run of the tongue very naturally and easily,a bit like rhythm in musical notes.It would be hard to imagine Foggy as Foggy Jones,Foggy Smith but Foggy Dewhurst is spot on.Imagine Auntie as Auntie Walker,Wilson and so on,they just dont hit the mark as well as Auntie Wainwright.

Hector.
Case in point to Hector's comment about the catchy names....

From the Truly era to name a few

Doggy Wilkinson
Goff Holliwell
Gavin Hinchecliffe
Biff Hemingway,

to name a few.

they just sort of roll off the tongue.

Perhaps none better than Foggy Dewhurst
 

Ess

Dedicated Member
Of course we must not forget that Bill Owen was a southerner/Londoner but his real surname was Rowbotham, which I would have thought of as a northern name.

And, to slightly change the subject have nick names died out altogether. I was brought up surrounded by men like Puffy Paviour, Polly Parrott, Frizzle Fry etc. One unfortunate man who had one leg shorter than the other went through life in our village known as 'Hoppy Leg Parrott'. My husband was Tiddler Kimber, and his brother was Ginger. My Grandsons seem not to have these names, which is a shame but in these politically correct times I expect there wound be a lot of bother about it!
 

chris

Dedicated Member
There was an old chap in our town called Ducky Weston ,he bred Aylesbury ducks now the nearest breeder is sixteen miles away and is considering packing up thats progress.Wesley Pegden has a certain ring about it and sounds a real Yorkshire name.
 

codfanglers

Dedicated Member
Ducky Weston definitely sounds like a Summer Wine name. I can just picture Clegg, Truly, and Billy wondering around the countryside talking about people from their past. I can just image Billy referring to him as "old Ducky".
 

toodlepip

Dedicated Member
LOL, horsefly with a nasty bite?? I wonder if Roy Clarke knew about that. But I´ll tell you something, we had a very good laugh one day when Peter Sallis received a parcel from a Mr Clegg in Yorkshire :D, so the name at least doesn´t seem to be unusual. I find names a very interesting subject, but I´m not into English names of course.
 

stewpot01

Dedicated Member
My other favourites used by Roy Clarke are Bickerdyke - used twice at least - and Gunnershaw. Both have a real Yorkshire ring about them.
 

Sheree

Dedicated Member
Maurice Micklewhite??? :eek: I don't know if I could get used to thinking
of Michael Caine as that!!! But , yes, it sounds very Yorkshire-ish! :)
 

stewpot01

Dedicated Member
Don't forget Wigglesworth either. Mentioned twice, once Clegg imagining he was the chap who took a wrong turn in his canoe and discovered America and the supplier of Billy Ingleton's piano (Wigglesworth, Cleckheaton) in his vision.
 
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