There was a man....

Roger

Dedicated Member
'The Woollen Mills Of Your Mind' was one of them when they came out of the pub. I can think of one more but I'll leave that for someone else to name.
 

Inky Batty

Dedicated Member
Well done Roger, when Compo says "there's nothing like 3 pints to ease the bruising".
That was the first time, the second was a good few series later.
 

Stephen

Dedicated Member
he had a wife....
and she was double jointed!!
Always cracks me up when Compo starts singing this and Foggy cuts him off.
I can think of two episodes where he sings this.
Can anyone name then? And better still, any advance on 2?
I always thought he says 'and she was double dutchin', as in talking gibberish or playing a skipping rope game at the time. Lol :fp: Thanks for clearing that up. :37:
 

Marianna

Dedicated Member
It sounds as though it ought to be a rope-skipping rhyme, but a very quick search didn't retrieve any reference to it except for very old posts on this forum.
 

captain clutterbuck

LOTSW Fanatic
Adding this here because there was a man ..............................who has lived in a remote cabin miles from anywhere for over 40 years with no electricity and other modern facilities we all have . He is affectionately known as the Hermit of Treig and they have made a documentary for BBC Scotland about him . There is an article about him on BBC News today so if anyone had ever dreamt of abandoning the modern world I would urge you to read the article and perhaps watch the Documentary which whilst on BBC Scotland will be on the Iplayer imminently.

 

Marianna

Dedicated Member
Adding this here because there was a man ..............................who has lived in a remote cabin miles from anywhere for over 40 years with no electricity and other modern facilities we all have . He is affectionately known as the Hermit of Treig and they have made a documentary for BBC Scotland about him . There is an article about him on BBC News today so if anyone had ever dreamt of abandoning the modern world I would urge you to read the article and perhaps watch the Documentary which whilst on BBC Scotland will be on the Iplayer imminently.

He had a stroke, but held it together well enough to use a GPS locator signal to send an SOS. He'd had the device for only a few days, but he was able to use it.

I had a stroke on September 1st and it took an interminable length of time to figure out how to use my very familiar cell phone! Apparently his stroke was much more severe than mine, though, given that he spent seven weeks in hospital. I was hospitalized for only four days, then discharged to my home, where I live by myself. Not like he lives, though. I'm in a village with very close neighbors, and I had weekly visits from a home nurse, as well as twice-weekly visits from a physical therapist. I was cleared to drive four weeks later.

My primary symptom was total aphasia, which faded away very quickly. I had regained the ability to speak by the end of the first day, and the "big" words, which I normally use, were back by the time I came home, so I was my normal gobby self.
 
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